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Blockchain Articles

Using a Docker container to run Bitcoin in regtest mode

One of the early activities when getting started with Bitcoin programming is configuring the development environment with a test blockchain. This article will step through the basics of using a Docker container in Ubuntu to run Bitcoin’s bitcoind in regtest mode. Bitcoin’s Regtest mode is summarised nicely in the Bitcoin documentation Developer Examples: "Bitcoin Core’s regression test mode (regtest mode) lets you instantly create a brand-new private block chain with the same basic rules as testnet — but one major difference: you choose when to create new blocks, so you have complete control over the environment.

Ethereum: Deploying smart contracts with the Ethereum wallet

This article continues on from the previous one where we installed the Ethereum wallet and connected to a private blockchain running locally on geth. In this article we’ll deploy a simple contract to the same blockchain using the Ethereum wallet. Previously… Check out these previous articles which describe setting up the dev environment and other tools I’ll be using: Ethereum: Setting up a development environment Ethereum: Deploying to a Private Blockchain Ethereum: Ethereum: Using the wallet with a private geth node Get ready with geth First make sure geth is running locally.

Ethereum: Using the wallet with a private geth node

Today I wanted to share the steps I follow to use the Ethereum wallet with a private blockchain in a development environment. This article follows on from previous articles where a local blockchain was setup using geth. For my dev environment I’ll be using Ubuntu 16 running on VirtualBox in Windows 10. Previously… Check out these previous articles which describe setting up the dev environment and other tools I’ll be using:

Ethereum: Creating a Block Explorer with React (Part 3)

Displaying Block Info in React This article continues the development of an Ethereum block explorer built in React. In part two we built a page that uses web3 to display a list of recent blocks. This third part of the series will continue the development and build a page to display details of an individual block. Previously… Check out these previous articles which describe setting up the dev environment and creating the first parts of the app:

Ethereum: Creating a Block Explorer with React (Part 2)

Listing Recent Blocks in React This article continues the development of an Ethereum block explorer built in React. I’ll continue right from where I left off in part one, so get ready. I hope you enjoy it. Previously… Check out these previous articles which describe setting up the dev environment and the first part of the app: Ethereum: Creating a Block Explorer with React (Part 1) Ethereum: Deploying to a Private Blockchain Ethereum: Setting up a development environment Getting started Change directory into the project folder blockexp and start the development server:

Ethereum: Creating a Block Explorer with React (Part 1)

Create a basic React app This is the first article in a mini-series that will step through building a simple Ethereum block explorer using React and web3. This first article covers creating and configuring the basic React app ‘skeleton’, while later articles will build out the functionality. React is a JavaScript library for building user interfaces created by the folk at Facebook. Read more about it here: https://facebook.github.io/react/. These steps we documented against Ubuntu 16.

Ethereum: EthExplorer block explorer

In this article I’ll walk through installing EthExplorer, a block explorer for Ethereum, in Ubuntu. For these steps, I’m running my Ubuntu instance in VirtualBox on a Windows 10 host. We’ll be following on from where we left off in the last article, Ethereum: Deploying to a Private Blockchain. There’s a few different open-source block explorer options available for Ethereum, including etherparty EthExplorer and it’s cousin, carsenk: https://github.com/etherparty/explorer https://github.

Ethereum: Deploy on a Private Blockchain

truffle, geth, and private blockchains A brief introduction to deploying smart contracts on a private blockchain with truffle and geth. Previously we went through setting up an Ethereum development environment with truffle and testrpc, and deploying a simple smart contract written in Solidity. Now we will take it a step further using truffle and geth to deploy a smart contract on a private blockchain. First, we will use geth to start a single node running locally on Ubuntu, then we’ll use truffle to deploy our smart contract.

Ethereum: Intro to Smart Contracts with Solidity and Truffle

‘Hello World’ Smart Contract with Truffle & testrpc Previously we setup an ethereum dev environment with truffle and ethereumjs-testrpc. This article will step through using truffle to create a basic hello world smart contract in Solidity, and deploying it locally with ethereumjs-testrpc. First, create a new directory to work from. In Ubuntu type: mkdir helloworld cd helloworld Then run truffle init to create a new app truffle init This creates some new folders and files:

Ethereum: Setting up a development environment

This article is a quick-start guide to setting up a Ethereum development environment. This setup can be used to develop smart contracts for both public and private blockchains. To facilitate rapid development we’ll be using ethereumjs-testrpc running in Ubuntu, and truffle to manage our projects, testing, compiling, and migration. ethereumjs-testrpc is a Node.js based Ethereum client for testing and development. Read more about it here: https://github.com/ethereumjs/testrpc truffle is a development environment, testing framework and asset pipeline for Ethereum, aiming to make life as an Ethereum developer easier.

Solidity: Using solc on Windows

The solc command line compiler is a C++ implementation of the Solidity compiler that can output opcodes for interpretation by the Ethereum Virtual Machine (EVM). There are plenty of excellent resources available covering Solidity, including the Solidity documentation. This article will step through the basics of getting started with solc on Windows. Install Solc on Windows Download the Windows binary from https://github.com/ethereum/solidity/releases Extract the solidity-windows.zip into a new folder